Ingot mould mystery - where's the ingots?

Another busy day on site, glorious weather, nice breeze to keep the cleggs away and plenty of visitors for our open day - what's not to like! Alan was busy drawing finds and today was working on some of our big stones - the ingot mould cleaned up beautifully and now looks really impressive, it's such a perfect disc, if only we could find an ingot cast in our mould that would just make our day:

Since Jackie's left to head back south Tom was allowed back onto site to take over her corbelled cell for the day (it's not that he's been banned from site, it's just that he's been running the sieving operation for a while now). There's just a bit more to come out before we shore it up and sandbag it for end of site - which is now horribly close, only another week before we start filling everything back in, where does the time go?

The Iron Age roundhouse in both the old and new trench is also looking good, the roundhouse wall is now clearly visible in the extension - it's taken a lot of hard work to get the new trench to this stage:

Down at the seaward side of the site Chloe's hard at work on her section through the tomb wall, where it's been damaged by later disturbance - she's kneeling on surviving tomb walling, but the bit in front of her was taken out probably in the Iron Age (curse those Iron Age builders and their quest for stone!):

Keith was in his Viking rig in between digging and had a display including replicas of things found on site, which are destined for the new Rousay Heritage Centre when it's built:


And finally to mention our newest recruit, our new dig dog (but only for the day) here seen guarding the site hut against all comers:

The dog was my fault - coming over the Birsay peat hill miles from anywhere this morning and there she was all on her own with no ID - wasn't sure if she was lost or had been abandoned, couldn't leave her there and had minutes to get the boat, so she came over to Rousay with me and down to site. Thanks to the wonders of modern technology that is the 'Orkney Pets Lost & Found' Facebook page her owner was soon located (though not before we'd decided to adopt her and call her 'Midden') and Harley (her real name) enjoyed a day out in Rousay, with cheese, oatcakes & sausage for lunch, and lots of cuddles before popping back over on the boat and home for her tea. It's a dog's life!

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Swandro - Orkney Coastal Archaeology Trust 

Scottish Charitable Incorporated Organisation No: SC047002 

Patron: His Royal Highness The Prince Charles, the Duke of Rothesay

Registered office: Bayview Birsay Orkney KW17 2LR   email: info@swandro.co.uk